Neale MustonCorse Motorsport will field up to three drivers in the new V8 class of the Radical Australia Cup in 2013.

The Wetherill Park, NSW, team has confirmed it will prepare the latest and most potent version of the British open-cockpit sports car for current Radical Australia Cup pointscore leader Neale Muston and GT racer Ash Samadi.

A third car is likely for Nick Kelly.

Corse Motorsport owner Mick Mitchell, who currently looks after Muston’s and Kelly’s SR3 Radicals and Samadi’s Mosler MT900S, expects the 2.7-litre SR8 to be significantly quicker than the 1.5-litre model.

“With 320kW and weighing only 680kg, the SR8 has a maximum speed of 285km/h – 35km/h faster than the SR3,” he said.

“The SR8 accelerates from 0-100km/h in 2.7 seconds – 0.4 seconds quicker than the four-cylinder car.

“It also has bigger discs than the SR3, so it should brake better too.

“In initial testing, the first SR8 to land in Australia lapped Sydney Motorsport Park in 1 minute 25 seconds.

“That’s four seconds faster than the SR3 record at SMP, which is already about equal to V8Supercar pace, so it should be a real weapon with some more sorting!

“SR3 drivers who have tried the SR8 tell me that the extra torque of the V8 makes a bigger difference than the power increase, and that it’s better balanced than the four-cylinder car.”

Muston’s and Samadi’s SR8s are due to arrive in November, giving Corse plenty of time to prepare them for next year’s Radical Australia Cup series.

Mitchell is an unabashed fan of the one-make Radical formula, which he believes offers drivers tremendous performance and great value.

“Radicals are fast, reliable, and easy to sort,” he said.

“They react well to set-up changes, which teaches new drivers what happens when they alter suspension, tyre and wing settings.

“From my point of view it’s a well-developed chassis that’s easy to work on. I only need a small pit crew for race meetings, which keeps costs and stress levels down.

“Radical’s Australian agent supports the category by carrying a good supply of spare parts, so the teams don’t have to tie up money in their own stockpiles.

“Best of all, the Radical Australia Cup is excellent value. It’s about a quarter of the cost of buying, preparing and racing a new GT3 car.

“Being a one-make series, you don’t have to update to the latest model every year to be competitive.

“The SR3 has been around for several years now with very few changes, and I expect the SR8 to be the same.

“Drivers get plenty of track time at each round of the series – either two sprints and a 50-minute mini-enduro, or two of the longer races.

“There’s also the prospect of Radicals racing in the Bathurst 12-hour, and Australian drivers travelling to long-distance events in Malaysia, Dubai and Spa-Francorchamps in the near future.

“The numbers are rising because the category is well organised, the rules are policed properly, and the drivers look after their machinery – unlike some one-make series, where there’s carnage at every corner.

“Although most Radical drivers have successful businesses, they’re not multi-millionaires.

“They’re not racing for sheep stations, but they do want bang for their racing bucks – and the Radical Australia Cup gives them plenty of that!”

RADICAL SR8 RX COMPETITION SPECIFICATIONS

Chassis: steel tube spaceframe with FIA safety cell and aluminium honeycomb crash structures

Body: 2-seat open-cockpit sports car; carbon fibre composite & fibreglass

Engine: rear-mounted 320kW 2.7-litre naturally aspirated alloy V8

Transmission: 6-speed sequential gearbox; limited-slip differential

Brakes: 280mm ventilated discs

Wheels: front – 15x8in; rear – 16x10in.

Tyres: front – 200/580/R15; rear – 265/605/R16 Dunlop slicks

Fuel tank: 77 litres

Dimensions: length – 4.1m; width – 1.79m; height – 1.04m

Dry weight: 680kg

Performance: top speed – 285km/h; 0-100km/h – 2.7sec.

CORSE MOTORSPORT

Corse Motorsport operates from 680sq.m premises in Wetherill Park, western Sydney.

Owner Mick Mitchell has been involved in motorsport vehicle preparation for nearly 30 years, beginning as an apprentice mechanic with a Sydney Alfa Romeo dealership.

That led to a position with Australian motorsport legend Colin Bond’s team, working on Bond’s Group A Alfa Romeo GTV6 and 75 Turbo, and Ford Sierra turbo RS500 from the mid-1980s until the early-1990s.

In 1992, Mick established Corse Automotive and Motorsport to specialise in all aspects of mechanical work on competition and high-performance cars.

As well as preparing and repairing cars, Corse undertakes custom fabrication work, classic car restorations, component machining, engine building, and suspension and brake upgrades.

In fact, he’ll tackle pretty much any job that customers request!

Mick and his team also provide technical and pit crew support at track days, testing, race meetings and tarmac rallies.

MORE INFORMATION

www.corse.com.au

Ph. (02) 9757-2966

Photo by Nathan Wong.